WHAT YOU DO, HOW YOU DO IT

Andrew Crawford led a group of entrepreneurs in a workshop on building their business and their client base.
BY ELIZABETH STOKKEBYE

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I attended Andrew Crawford’s workshop, Techniques for Successful Selling: a new approach to selling to direct clients, on September 28, 2012. Early on, Crawford directed us to define our positioning statement. “First you are brief, telling your client what you do; then you are compelling, describing how you do it; and then you throw the hook, why it has value to your client.” Sounds easy, non? → continue reading

READY TO PROCEED

Aspiring court interpreters gathered in downtown San Francisco to hone their interpreting skills and prepare for the California Court Interpreter Examination.
BY NIELS NIELSON

On Saturday, October 20, 2012, I attended a language-neutral workshop led by Angela Zawadzki, a native of Colombia and an English/Spanish Federal and California State certified interpreter with over 20 years of experience. The workshop was targeted to those interested in taking the Judicial Council of California’s Court Interpreter Examination. It was held at the offices of the Judicial Council of California at 455 Golden Gate Avenue in San Francisco, opposite the old Federal Building and behind the building housing the Supreme Court of California at Civic Center Plaza in San Francisco. → continue reading

STARTING UP

Michael Schubert provided guidance to a group of language-minded individuals just getting started in translation.
BY RENY VOGT-LOWELL

tl_35-1_web_page20_image12On Saturday, January 26, a dozen or so curious, bilingual (at least) individuals gathered at the San Francisco State University Downtown Campus, seeking guidance and insight in determining how to use their foreign language fluency to find employment in the field of translation. Guidance and insight was provided by Michael Schubert, who led the three and a half hour NCTA sponsored presentation, Getting Started in Translation. Based on his presentation and, more importantly, his impromptu responses to questions raised by the participants, it did not take long for me to realize that Michael was definitely an expert, and that the seminar was on track to meet my expectations. Michael’s interactive style with participants of diverse backgrounds, interests, and motivations led to a very engaging, informative, and entertaining seminar. → continue reading

SOUND RECOMMENDATIONS

Susanna Zaraysky’s fascinating presentation on language theory took her audience through the realms of science, music, and film.
BY TERESA CARBAJAL RAVET

tl_35-1_web_page20_image18The December General Meeting of the Northern California Translators Association hosted polyglot author, language educator, and world traveler, Susanna Zaraysky. Susanna gave a harmonious presentation on Language is Music that had her audience reminiscing of childhood lullabies and commercial jingles. Ms. Zaraysky speaks seven languages, is the author of two books, Language is Music and Travel Happy, Budget Low, and is the host of a Spanish-language segment, El idioma es música on the morning show Al Despertar on Univision San Francisco. → continue reading

HAPPY HOURS

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Our colleague Raffaella Buschiazzo has been organizing the NCTA happy hours for a while now, and I’ve been attending them off and on for a few months. They are definitely worth the trip! It’s fun to have the chance to hang out with fellow translators and chat about work. Actually, let me point this out: you might be surprised at just how enjoyable it can be. It’s great to be able to discuss translating work, to exchange ideas, and to take in all the warm camaraderie and moral support. I almost always leave with some useful new bit of information…and I leave feeling good about the work that I do. I enjoy chatting with my fellow translators about shared interests outside of work, too. Although, I must admit, these conversations often center around travel and languages. Having attended about half a dozen happy hours and NCTA meetings thus far, I’ve concluded that translators tend to be thoughtful and interesting people on the whole. In fact, I try never to miss a chance to hang out with other translators. We’ve even had a few non-translators show up at the happy hours from time to time, and they’re alright too. So if you haven’t come to a happy hour yet, it’s definitely worth a try. And a tip: if the happy hour is held at the taco eatery in the Ferry Building, the food is good, but be sure to dress warmly because the place can get a bit drafty. I hope to see you there! SE

THE TRANSLORIAL TOOL KIT

The Tool Kit is an online newsletter that comes to its subscribers’ mailboxes twice a month. In Translorial, we offer a quarterly digest of Jost’s most helpful tips from the past season.
BY JOST ZETZSCHE © 2013 INTERNATIONAL WRITERS’ GROUP, COMPILED BY YVES AVÉROUS

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The keyboard layout jungle
Multilingual computing has always faced the challenge of different input methods and keyboard layouts for different languages. This will continue to be a challenge, with new solutions cropping up here and there. For Windows users, Microsoft has been remarkably good at offering built-in keyboards for more than 120 languages and the ability to extend or compose your own language keyboard with the Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator. → continue reading

THE TRANSMUG REPORT —
THE END OF THE LINE

BY YVES AVÉROUS

WWDC MMXIIIAt WWDC  in June 2013, Apple finally broke the silence on their latest secrets: new operating systems for the Mac® and iDevices,  a long awaited radio service, a sneak peek at a futuristic Mac Pro® soon to be built in Texas, a preview of a Web-based iWork®, and updated MacBook Airs® with brand new Wi-Fi base stations to fit their new, faster specs. → continue reading

FIELD KNOWLEDGE

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Tuomas Kostiainen’s workshop serves up valuable instruction for improving skills and efficiency in Trados Studio—even if you think you already know it all!
BY SUSAN ROSE

Translation software (i.e. computer-assisted translation, or CAT) in the translation industry is the equivalent of a hammer in construction: it is essential. And if you’re doing business in a large commercial sector, Trados is the standard—at least for now. → continue reading

TRANSLATION AND ETHNOGRAPHY:
ETHNOCENTRIC
OR NON-ETHNOCENTRIC?

Two disciplines, common goals: understanding cultural codes, discovering order in “the foreign,” rendering through language an appreciation of “the unknown other.”

BY MEHDI ASADZADEH AND ALI ABBASI

To an ordinary reader, translation might mean finding “equivalents” for the words of the source text in the target language, thereby making the words of one language understandable in another. But for a translation researcher, it denotes a broader phenomenon where the strangeness has to be found out, decoded and incorporated into the rendered text. → continue reading

BRING THE SOUND OF HOME TO…

Voice Acting hopefuls take the plunge during an organized day trip to Medialocate. Do they have what it takes? BY ANA ISABEL BELTRAN AND NOEMI GONZALEZ

Voiceover artists, those disembodied voices we hear in audio books, commercials and public announcements can conjure laughter, relief, mystery, awe, respect and sadness. In audio books, voiceover artists may make imaginations soar. In commercials, they may sway a consumer’s perception on a bank’s trustworthiness, an insurance company’s reliability or an automobile’s safety. What about movies? → continue reading

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY BOOTCAMP

Considered a “dead language” by some, Latin continues to flourish in the world of Science and Medicine. Bootcamp attendees get the breakdown. BY MIKE KARPA

Marlene V. Obermeyer guided interpreters and translators through the lingo of medicine and the human body in an eight-hour medical terminology bootcamp held June 30, 2012, six floors above Market Street at the San Francisco State downtown campus. Obermeyer, a long-time registered nurse with a Masters degree, offers online training in medical interpreting and terminology from her base in Kansas through Culture Advantage and Virginia College. She also gives a handful of medical terminology bootcamps annually around the country through the IMIA. Carlos Garcia of the IMIA has been trying to schedule a bootcamp in San Francisco for some time, and he and NCTA organizer Sarah Llewellyn were delighted to be able to jointly host Obermeyer. → continue reading