ADDING UP THE NUMBERS

Webinar presenter David Jemielity

Webinar presenter David Jemielity

January 2014 marked a milestone—NCTA’s first webinar! This new chapter in NCTA’s history was kicked off by David Jemielity, Senior English Translator and Head of Translations at Banque Cantonale Vaudoise in Switzerland.

BY SARAH LLEWELLYN

I first came across David Jemielity at the ATA conference in Denver, where he was the Distinguished Speaker for the French Language Division, delivering two terrific presentations on how to make financial translations sound less like… translations. When I asked him last year if he would be willing to adapt his presentations into a webinar for us, I was thrilled when he said yes. His presentation had never been offered as a webinar, so we also had a world first! → continue reading

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NATURAL ENGLISH IN JA-EN TRANSLATIONS? YES, IT IS POSSIBLE!

When he's not presenting a webinar, Mike Karpa can be found walking his whoodle.

When he’s not presenting a webinar, Mike Karpa can be found walking his whoodle.

The inaugural season of NCTA webinars has found scores of fans, both stateside and abroad, allowing NCTA members to connect and learn a few new tricks.

BY MARIAN KINOSHITA

A few weeks ago, I participated in my very first webinar. Actually, participated isn’t quite accurate. I signed up, fully aware that the live March 4th broadcast at the civilized hour of 9 a.m. (in San Francisco) signified a harrowing 2 a.m. for me the following morning (Japan Standard Time). I opted for the recording, available to participants for 90 days after the session. As a webinar neophyte, I wasn’t sure what to expect. → continue reading

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TRANSLATION AND ETHNOGRAPHY:
ETHNOCENTRIC
OR NON-ETHNOCENTRIC?

Two disciplines, common goals: understanding cultural codes, discovering order in “the foreign,” rendering through language an appreciation of “the unknown other.”

BY MEHDI ASADZADEH AND ALI ABBASI

To an ordinary reader, translation might mean finding “equivalents” for the words of the source text in the target language, thereby making the words of one language understandable in another. But for a translation researcher, it denotes a broader phenomenon where the strangeness has to be found out, decoded and incorporated into the rendered text. → continue reading

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THE TRANSLORIAL TOOL KIT

The Tool Kit is an online newsletter that comes to its subscribers’ mailboxes twice a month. In Translorial, we offer a quarterly digest of Jost’s most helpful tips from the past season. BY JOST ZETZSCHE © 2012 INTERNATIONAL WRITERS’ GROUP, COMPILED BY YVES AVÉROUS

Refactored memoQ
Rather than just looking at the new features of recent tools and versions of memoQ, I chatted with the developers to get some of the background story. I met with István and Gábor to hear them out about version 6. → continue reading
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FITTING IT ALL TOGETHER

Hosted by the ATA and NCTA, the triennial conference for the International Federation of Translators provided insight and camaraderie for translators and translation companies alike. BY MARILYN LUONG

The world is getting smaller. We as translators (including interpreters and other language professionals) have facilitated this shrinkage. In the beginning of August this year, we have made the world yet a little smaller through gathering at the triennial conference of the International Federation of Translators (FIT). Held in 
San Francisco, the conference was hosted by the American Translators Association (ATA). As the host chapter, NCTA had a well-visited exhibit booth. → continue reading

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TOURANSLATION: A MONEY-MAKING FUSION

Focus on the relationships between translation and the tourism industry could prove lucrative for translators and visited countries alike. BY MEHDI ASADZADEH, PhD

ABSTRACT

Translation Studies approaches the phenomenon of translation from different perspectives. The present paper explores the relationship between translation and the tourism industry as a potential area for Translation Studies. Tourism has evolved in recent years, and allows tourism operators to benefit financially from human interest in exploring the world. Specialized translation services could help tourism operators overcome the language gap, as well as help translators to search out their best place as a part of that industry and get their due financial share of a potentially large emerging market. By presenting some facts and figures, the present paper attempts to stimulate translators to rethink their strategies in a way to foster better cooperation with tourism operators.

→ continue reading

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THE LANGUAGE OF CREATIVITY

What constitutes a creative act? Is the translation of a work merely interpretation, or is there something more? Translator and author Cristina Vezzaro shares her own creative introspection. BY RAFFAELLA BUSCHIAZZO

NCTA and the Italian Cultural Institute jointly presented Creativity Revealed: from Translation to Writing with Cristina Vezzaro on August 3rd at the Italian Cultural Institute in downtown San Francisco. Cristina Vezzaro shared her explorations of creativity, from translation to writing and back to translation. Her thoughts are the result of examining her personal experience as a literary translator and writer, and of extensive research in related fields. → continue reading

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A TALE OF LINGUISTIC SURVIVAL

Cover of the September 2011 issue of Translorial.Despite a long history of oppression, the ancient and beautiful Ukrainian language lives on. BY NINA BOGDAN

My recent travels to Ukraine and Russia gave me reason to reflect on the turbulent history of the Ukrainian language. It is a language that has survived despite years of oppression and attempts throughout history to negate and eradicate it. My father was born in a tiny village in the eastern part of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic in the 1920’s. By the time he arrived in the United States, he had become accustomed to speaking Russian as he lived in a Displaced Persons Camp in Germany for several years, where the primary language was Russian. I had always assumed that he had grown up speaking Russian but, when I first visited the place where he was born, I realized that this was not necessarily so. → continue reading

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SHIFTING TRENDS IN THE NEW GENERATION OF LANGUAGE PROFESSIONALS

Jacolyn Harmer presenter at the May GM.

Jacolyn Harmer, presenter at the May General Meeting.

While technology skills are increasing among the young, critical thinking is taking a hit. BY NAOMI NORBERG

On a Saturday afternoon so beautiful it didn’t bode well for high turnout, NCTA members showed their dedication by showing up in significant numbers for the May 7 general meeting in downtown San Francisco. The meeting began as usual with a welcome session for new members (six or seven this time) and networking among the rest. Our new president Paula Dieli then began the meeting by introducing the new “refreshment queens” Connie Archea and Rita McGaughy, and thanking ION Translations, LLC of Berkeley for sponsoring the refreshments.

Kristen Corridan then announced the upcoming events and workshops, including the summer picnic (June 26th), the Legal Translation for Court Interpreters and Translators workshop (June 18th), and a workshop (no date given) by Tuomas Kostianen on preparing for the ATA certification exam (next San Francisco sitting on July 31st, just before the FIT conference). Paula then announced the arrival of the latest Translorial, and Yves Avérous asked for volunteers to replace Nina Bogdan, who will step down in September after three years as Translorial editor. Roles will be split so that those who want to deal with the writing aspect can do that while others take on administrative and logistic tasks. Kristen then introduced Jacolyn Harmer, who spoke to us about Shifting Trends in Translator and Interpreter Training. → continue reading

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THE MINDFUL TRANSLATOR IN THE AGE OF AUTOMATION

To avoid mental laziness brought on by new tech tools, make a point of watching yourself and your mind at work. BY JULIET E. JOHNSON

Technological changes over the past decades have revolutionized how we translators work as well as the very nature of translation. More subtly, the tools we use have altered our cognitive processes. The purpose of this article is to highlight the connections between how we work, how we think, and what it means to be a translator. Seeing those connections more clearly can help us mindfully choose how we work, how we think, and what kind of translation work we personally undertake and pursue. → continue reading

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THE PRICE-FIXING TABOO

Are language service providers limited in their ability to address downward price pressures due to now irrelevant anti-trust legislation? BY STAFFORD HEMMER

In February 2011, fellow NCTA Jonathan Goldberg member posted a message to the NCTA groups list about a Hebrew-English job offer he had recently received. He was willing to investigate the option of taking on the assignment from a client who expressed dismay at the quality of the existing translation products they had been receiving. However, when Goldberg learned that the compensation for his work would be “$0.05/word – no match,” naturally the conversation was terminated. Hebrew<>English is a language pair that, according to the ATA’s 2007 Translation and Interpreting Survey of Compensation, generally commands about $0.22/word by the average ATA language service provider (LSP). Mr. Goldberg noted that, “the fact that they have had a translator until now working at that rate, irrespective of the quality of the translations, is cause for concern. Some translators should be reminded that there is no need to agree to such a low rate or even to agree to double that rate―particularly if the translation is from English and more particularly if it requires a non-Latin font.” → continue reading

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