MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY BOOTCAMP

Considered a “dead language” by some, Latin continues to flourish in the world of Science and Medicine. Bootcamp attendees get the breakdown. BY MIKE KARPA

Marlene V. Obermeyer guided interpreters and translators through the lingo of medicine and the human body in an eight-hour medical terminology bootcamp held June 30, 2012, six floors above Market Street at the San Francisco State downtown campus. Obermeyer, a long-time registered nurse with a Masters degree, offers online training in medical interpreting and terminology from her base in Kansas through Culture Advantage and Virginia College. She also gives a handful of medical terminology bootcamps annually around the country through the IMIA. Carlos Garcia of the IMIA has been trying to schedule a bootcamp in San Francisco for some time, and he and NCTA organizer Sarah Llewellyn were delighted to be able to jointly host Obermeyer. → continue reading

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THE TERM’S THE THING

Industry experts provide an informative perspective on the trickier aspects of financial and legal translation BY JAY FEIST

In December, NCTA members had the opportunity to learn some of the ins-and-outs of financial and legal translation from two veteran translators with decades of experience in these fields. In their presentations, they brought their experience to bear on the problem of terminology. → continue reading

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A CAT IN A SACK (I.E. A PIG IN A POKE)?

The Russian idiom “buying a cat in a sack” means the same as the English idiom “buying a pig in a poke.”

Will tools typically used for analytical translations prove efficacious for fiction and poetry? A literary translator learns about CAT tools and considers their application in her own field. BY ANNE O. FISHER

For some time now I have been curious about CAT (Computer-Assisted Translation) tools and whether they would be useful for someone who translates primarily fiction and poetry. Unlike translators in other fields, literary translators are almost never required by their “clients” (publishers, poets, grant-distributing associations) to use CAT tools, but maybe there’s something we’re missing if we don’t? The NCTA CAT tools workshop on November 12th, 2011, was a good introduction to what these tools do and a great way to get specific information in a short time for not a lot of money. As for the particular applicability of CAT tools to literary translation, it seems that there is less to fear, and more reason to use them, than I thought. → continue reading

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EDITING AND REVISION FOR TRANSLATORS

Professor Malcolm Williams guides workshop participants through the interactive presentation.

A bright winter workshop provided attendees with an excellent opportunity to gain tips and further hone editing skills. BY CHRISTOPHER PAUL QUEEN

Saturday, January 28th brought sunny weather outside, brightening the inside of the downtown SFSU Extension Center classroom where a group of translators assembled to further develop their skills in the editing and revision of written documents. Professor Malcolm Williams, from the School of Translation and Interpretation at the University of Ottawa, presented his 6-step approach to the production of documents of deliverable quality, which he calls The 6 C’s of Quality Editing: Concision, Clarity, Coherence, Cohesion, Consistency, Correctness. → continue reading

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APPROACHES TO MEMOQ

Tuomas Kostiainen explains the basics of memoQ.

New to MemoQ? Help is available for every learning style.
BY MICHAEL WAHLSTER

I had to get up early on Saturday, February 25, to catch the first flight from L.A. to San Francisco where I attended Tuomas Kostiainen’s NCTA memoQ workshop at the SFSU downtown campus.

Just in case you missed it: memoQ is a translation memory tool developed by the Hungarian company Kilgray Translation Technologies. I became aware of it around 2009, mainly through blog posts and tweets by translators located in Europe. The program was generally described as easy to use and competitively priced, but translators were most impressed, it seemed, with the rapid response of Kilgray to users’ support requests. → continue reading

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GETTING TECHNICAL

The two-part workshop proved worthwhile for participants, who picked up pointers for technical translation and post-editing.

Expert tips on style coupled with a comprehensive review of machine translation post-editing issues prepare attendees for success.  BY ELENA OW-WING

On Saturday, July 30, the Technical Writing for “into English” Translators & The Art and Science of Post-Editing workshop enjoyed a turnout of 20 participants at the SFSU Downtown Campus. The first presentation, on methods and techniques of technical translation, was made by Karen Tkaczyk, a technical translator and editor with a pharmaceutical industry background. The second topic, dealing with attitudes toward machine translation (MT) and MT post-editing issues, was introduced by Mike Dillinger, Vice President of the Association for Machine Translation in the Americas and Principal at TOPs Globalization Consulting. → continue reading

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WHAT YOU DIDN’T LEARN AS A TRANSLATION STUDENT

Presenter Ingrid Holm

How do you start your career as a freelance translator? A two-day conference helps grads get a leg up in the translation industry. BY INGRID HOLM

This past September 26th and 28th, I gave a two-day conference entitled What You Didn’t Learn as a Translation Student to a group of upper level translation students in the Translation specialization of the Applied Linguistics program at the Catholic University of Ecuador in Quito. The talk gave attendees an introduction to how to start their careers as freelance translators, and provided an overview of the various aspects that go into starting their business. The information was divided into three subject areas: Marketing, Networking, and Specialization.

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GETTING STARTED IN TRANSLATION

Professionalism and common sense a must for growing a business. BY NAOMI NORBERG

On Saturday March 5, about twenty new and confirmed translators gathered for the Getting Started in Translation workshop at the SFSU Downtown Campus. The presents were Michael Schubert, a successful freelancer, and Melissa Wheeler, a Senior Project Manager at Medialocate. Both emphasized the professionalism and common sense necessary to grow any business, adding refreshing, encouraging specifics with respect to our profession. → continue reading

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GETTING UP TO SPEED IN TRADOS

Facing your technophobia. BY MERAV ROZENBLUM

I’ll start with a confession: I’ve never considered myself a techie. But over the last couple of years, I found myself working for major Silicon Valley corporations with a team of localizers who were what Jost Zetzsche calls “Jerombots”: “as passionate about languages as St. Jerome, with the added power of modern technology” (Niels Nielsen, Cat Tools Workshop, Translorial Vol. 33, No. 1, January 2011). What I learned from them was not only mastery of certain CAT tools and software, but also to face my own technophobia.

This (still) conscious effort to keep up with the world of translation memory (TM) technology, as well as the realization that the new SDL Trados Studio 2009 is a standalone program that looks pretty different from the older version that I have been using in the MS Windows environment, brought me, along with 15 other participants, to the beginner Trados workshop offered on Saturday, November 13, 2010 with master teacher and then NCTA president Tuomas Kostiainen, a Finnish translator (given the choice, wouldn’t you, too, prefer the examples in a Trados workshop to be in Finnish?). → continue reading

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JOST ZETZSCHE’S CAT TOOLS WORKSHOP

A timely and entertaining introduction to the tools of our trade. BY NIELS NIELSEN

On Saturday, October 2, 2010, Jost Zetzsche, perhaps best known to most for his GeekSpeak column in the ATA Chronicle, presented a workshop on CAT tools from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm at the downtown campus of San Francisco State University. In view of the ongoing changes in the translation industry brought about by technology, the importance of this topic was not lost on anyone. → continue reading

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THE ENTREPRENEURIAL LINGUIST

Linguists receive valuable tips on how to run their business. BY SARAH LLEWELLYN

The Entrepreneurial Linguist, the bookLinguist and author Judy Jenner, who runs Twin Translations in Las Vegas, presented a half-day workshop in downtown San Francisco on April 10 to share some of the lessons she learned in business school and explain how they could be applied to the field of freelance translation and interpreting. → continue reading

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