APPROACHES TO MEMOQ

Tuomas Kostiainen explains the basics of memoQ.

New to MemoQ? Help is available for every learning style.
BY MICHAEL WAHLSTER

I had to get up early on Saturday, February 25, to catch the first flight from L.A. to San Francisco where I attended Tuomas Kostiainen’s NCTA memoQ workshop at the SFSU downtown campus.

Just in case you missed it: memoQ is a translation memory tool developed by the Hungarian company Kilgray Translation Technologies. I became aware of it around 2009, mainly through blog posts and tweets by translators located in Europe. The program was generally described as easy to use and competitively priced, but translators were most impressed, it seemed, with the rapid response of Kilgray to users’ support requests. → continue reading

Share

THE TRANSLORIAL TOOL KIT – DUCKDUCKGO

The Tool Kit is an online newsletter that comes to its subscribers’ mailboxes twice a month. In Translorial, we offer a quarterly digest of Jost’s most helpful tips from the past season. BY JOST ZETZSCHE © 2012 INTERNATIONAL WRITERS’ GROUP, COMPILED BY YVES AVÉROUS

DuckDuckGo(ose)
I was just reminded of a new search engine called DuckDuckGo. Apparently it’s rapidly gaining in popularity after some of Google’s recent privacy controversies. The makers of DuckDuckGo have paid heed to Google’s struggles and go to great length to ensure the privacy of your searches. → continue reading

Share

THE MINDFUL TRANSLATOR IN THE AGE OF AUTOMATION

To avoid mental laziness brought on by new tech tools, make a point of watching yourself and your mind at work. BY JULIET E. JOHNSON

Technological changes over the past decades have revolutionized how we translators work as well as the very nature of translation. More subtly, the tools we use have altered our cognitive processes. The purpose of this article is to highlight the connections between how we work, how we think, and what it means to be a translator. Seeing those connections more clearly can help us mindfully choose how we work, how we think, and what kind of translation work we personally undertake and pursue. → continue reading

Share

THE TRANSLORIAL TOOL KIT – THE SHEEP SYNDROME

The latest technology update from the Tool Kit. BY JOST ZETZSCHE

“Sheep syndrome” doesn’t have very positive connotations, but in some cases the result of one following another is a lot more beneficial than its negative image might let on. Take technology, for instance. In a competitive landscape, the innovation of one competitor will inevitably lead to others following suit — if that were not the case, we probably wouldn’t have a competitive landscape to start with.

In the case of translation environment tools, this phenomenon has been repeated over and over with quality assurance features, context matches, concordance searches, and, lately, with AutoComplete features, i.e., the ability of the translation editor to predict or suggest text based on a few typed letters in combination with external data, such as the translation memory or other databases.

The latest tool that has now unveiled this feature is Wordfast Classic, and I have to admit that, somewhat to my own surprise, I like its version of AutoComplete the best so far. More on that later. → continue reading

Share

THE TRANSMUG REPORT – CHRISTMAS IN JULY

BY YVES AVÉROUS

The summer of 2011 was a good season for the Mac. Not only does Apple computers’ market share continue to grow faster than that of Windows PCs’, but the platform received a very nice refresh with the launch of Lion and the addition of the Thunderbolt connectivity across the line.

I had already rounded up the main features of Lion in my previous report, now I have tried them. As a writer, the very first thing I enjoyed using in the text editing features that come with the system was the newly adopted AutoCorrect system akin to the one found on iOS devices (iPhones, iPads, iPod touchs). It’s working in Mail, Safari (and the WordPress Editor takes advantage of it—not Google Docs, alas), TextEdit, and Pages, for the obvious ones. How nice it would be to see it implemented in a native Mac CAT tool… (Wink, wink, nod, nod.) → continue reading

Share

GETTING UP TO SPEED IN TRADOS

Facing your technophobia. BY MERAV ROZENBLUM

I’ll start with a confession: I’ve never considered myself a techie. But over the last couple of years, I found myself working for major Silicon Valley corporations with a team of localizers who were what Jost Zetzsche calls “Jerombots”: “as passionate about languages as St. Jerome, with the added power of modern technology” (Niels Nielsen, Cat Tools Workshop, Translorial Vol. 33, No. 1, January 2011). What I learned from them was not only mastery of certain CAT tools and software, but also to face my own technophobia.

This (still) conscious effort to keep up with the world of translation memory (TM) technology, as well as the realization that the new SDL Trados Studio 2009 is a standalone program that looks pretty different from the older version that I have been using in the MS Windows environment, brought me, along with 15 other participants, to the beginner Trados workshop offered on Saturday, November 13, 2010 with master teacher and then NCTA president Tuomas Kostiainen, a Finnish translator (given the choice, wouldn’t you, too, prefer the examples in a Trados workshop to be in Finnish?). → continue reading

Share

THE TOOL KIT – A BAG OF TRICKS

The latest technology update from the Tool Kit. BY JOST ZETZSCHE

Just Now Updated to Office 2010?

If you own an English, German, Chinese, or Japanese version of Microsoft Office, that’s the language that you’ll get for all the menus—oh, sorry, “ribbons”—dialogs, error messages, and other user interface controls. You do have more than one spelling and grammar checker installed with your particular language version of Microsoft Office (here you can check what kind of spelling checkers are included with what language version of Office), but if you are intent on using a spelling language that is not covered by your language version, you’ll have to look into purchasing an additional language pack. This is, unless you are a user of one of approximately 60 “minor” languages (I just recently learned that the politically correct term here is “languages of limited diffusion”), in which case you might find a link to a free download of an LIP (Language Interface Pack). This includes the ability to run Office in that language and use the spelling checker and sometimes even a help system and templates in that language. → continue reading

Share

SOME DINOSAURS AND DRAGONS…

The young whippersnappers today have no idea how good they have it. BY INES SWANEY

When NCTA was founded in 1978, any mention of e-mail would have been understood as Express Mail known in the United States as Special Delivery. This was the common way of sending urgent information, all typed or printed on paper, of course.  Fax machines were a luxury that some major companies had at their offices. I still recall my first encounter with one of these devices. Someone explained to me that it worked just like a photocopier, except that you started with an original and then the copy would come out somewhere else, even in another continent, as long as everyone’s telephones lines were working properly and you got to keep the original. My cousin in Houston, who was involved in the energy industry, bragged that he had received a fax all the way from Qatar. → continue reading

Share

THE TRANSMUG REPORT – THE NATIVE MAC CAT TOOL

BY YVES AVÉROUS

It has been over a year already since my Challenge for a New Decade post, calling for a native Mac CAT tool—in other words, a Cocoa-based program, developed with the technology shared by Apple to create powerful, simple and elegant applications. The only advance we have seen in the past year was the return of Wordfast (Classic) on a brand new version of Word. Nothing very native in all that, a sort of Back to the Future experience that makes you feel like a corrected wrong doesn’t really make a right. → continue reading

Share

JOST ZETZSCHE’S CAT TOOLS WORKSHOP

A timely and entertaining introduction to the tools of our trade. BY NIELS NIELSEN

On Saturday, October 2, 2010, Jost Zetzsche, perhaps best known to most for his GeekSpeak column in the ATA Chronicle, presented a workshop on CAT tools from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm at the downtown campus of San Francisco State University. In view of the ongoing changes in the translation industry brought about by technology, the importance of this topic was not lost on anyone. → continue reading

Share

THE TOOL KIT – ANOTHER OFFICE & TRANSLATOR TRAINING

BY JOST ZETZSCHE

Another Office? Should We Care?

To give you just a first impression (those of you who have seen the new version will agree with this): Office 2010 in relation to Office 2007 is like Windows 7 is to Windows Vista. You see, Windows Vista was really quite good, but possibly not quite ready for show time. Quite a few aspects were a bit half-baked. You could see the good intentions behind many of the features, but they were either too hard to use and/or tedious or simply did not work quite right. Most of that was fixed in Windows 7, which turned out to be a stable and very workable operating system. → continue reading

Share